About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
the past year, we have seen great progress [inaudible] leading the way. but just as the u.k. deficit is not balanced with the government public transport issue are not solved in one year. we're public transport continued a national priority. we can't -- [inaudible] for the like of my young cousin. we can deliver more transport to get students from point a to point b. we can build a better, brighter future for young people. so when the opposition argument say it's not a national campaign, a focus of the divided region. i tell you this, divided we are weak, but united are the nation we are strong. more nation, one notion, one campaign. better public transport. [applause] [applause] >> thank you very much ib keyed for that. i note we have been joined by the former government chief when the labour party was in office nick browne. the member of parliament. it's great to have you here. thank you for coming. to oppose the motion, i call from the east of england. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. we are here for one reason. to make contain and empower the young people that we so proudly
between us is we won the large multinational companies to pay proper taxes here in the u.k.. we believe you do that by having lower tax rate and we reduce the rate of corporation tax but by making sure they declare their income properly. that is why on this specific issue of transfer, companies have been pursuing strange practices to pretend there revenues aren't delivered in the u.k. and run down their tax bills. .. >> the entry of the energy bill to parliament now means we can get out there and sell to all of the energy companies the very clear and stable framework that the u.k. has for offshore wind, for nuclear, for renewables and, indeed, for gas. i think it's a very positive development, there's a huge amount of potential, pent-up investment, and we need to make sure that results in british jobs and apprenticeships, and the government is fully committed to making that happen. >> [inaudible] pruitt. >> the prime minister obviously believes within the leveson report, there exists something that is bonkers. how would the prime minister give the views of his planning minister
and the uk government on following the lead of the scottish government and scottish parliament in its using equal marriage minimum pricing for alcohol and previously on the smoking ban. given the fact that unemployment is now lower in scotland than the rest of the uk, will he follow the lead of the scottish government by introducing a more shovel-ready measures for economic growth? >> i think what the honorable gentleman will find is because of the measures taken in the autumn statement, there's an extra 300 million pounds for the scottish government to spend, so if they want to spend that on shovel-ready measures they can. but i certainly am happy to say that when good policies are introduced in any party, in the united kingdom to i think we all have the opportunity to follow them. >> order. statements, the prime minister. >> here on c-span2 we will leave the british house of commons now as they move onto other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's questions time era questions time error of life wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern of parliament is in session. you can see thi
, canada and the u.k. they tend to be only about 15 -- 10-15% money comes from the private sector in terms of equity, that is. and it really is because the costs of capital for that equity is definitely based on precedent deal north of 10% cost of capital. so usually for projects such as this they would start with any potential grant money available first, then maybe any potential subsidized or low-cost loans and eventually figure out how much more additional capital would be needed and could the private sector be able to come up with that amount. and, again, given the size of the total project, um, i think we haven't had the ability to say if that's f the that's -- if there's enough capital to do that, but in segments and given the general interest in rail, i believe that if structured appropriately, there should be a way to do this. >> but you do say 10-15% of the total project cost. >> right. >> provided capital. where does the rest come from? >> that's right. if you look at a lot of the projects, for example, some of the toll road projects that were built in florida, a lot of it comes
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4